Empower online scheduling with business rules

Posted by Brad Veach on Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Chances are, if you ask a provider to open their schedule for patients and other providers to access at will, they’re going to say, “No”.

“But”, you might say, “this is going to bring more patients and more revenue to you and your practice!”

Doesn’t matter. The answer is still, “No”.

While it may seem confusing or hard to understand why a provider wouldn’t want more revenue, the truth is that they have good reasons to say no. If patients and other providers have unrestricted access to a provider’s calendar, then the provider loses control.

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What your EHR can’t do

Posted by Daniel Collins on Wednesday, January 11, 2017

An electronic health records system (EHR) is typically a healthcare organization’s largest IT investment. And generally by a wide margin.

EHRs have the potential to provide substantial benefits to physicians, clinic practices, and health care organizations. But when it comes to patient access, they are more limited than you realize.

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Patient Experience 2.0

Posted by Evan Miles on Wednesday, December 28, 2016

 

How are the top health systems in the country redesigning Patient Experience (PX) today?

Jarrard, a healthcare communications firm, has a new study which surveyed more than 100 of the nation’s top health systems – including non-profit, investor-owned, children’s hospitals, academic medical centers, regional and national systems — and one theme consistently emerged: forward-thinking health systems are expanding their concept of PX well beyond the world of inpatient care.

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9 ways to fix patient access

Posted by Daniel Collins on Thursday, December 22, 2016

1. Despite the rise of on-demand services like AirBnB and Uber, there are many reasons why healthcare lags behind the tech advancements of other industries. To see how consumer demand is reversing this, and helping revolutionize the way patients access care, read Health IT Outcomes’ article on “Matching Patients With The Right Provider”.

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When population health and patient engagement work together

Posted by Daniel Collins on Wednesday, November 30, 2016

The Population Health Alliance defines engagement as, “when an individual performs sustained actions toward achieving optimal health and well-being.” As an example, a person living with diabetes could be considered engaged when they “actively participate and collaborate in their treatment plan, expend effort learning as much as they can about their condition and practice routine self-care.”

With this in mind, how can population health efforts tap into the benefits of patient engagement? Our own Chris Lukasiak has a recent article in Beckers that attempts to answer this question.

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Patient access is mission critical

Posted by Brad Veach on Friday, November 25, 2016

In a 2014 report, McKinsey and Company explains that patient access is a top strategic item for provider CEOs for three different reasons:

The need to transform outpatient performance to enable future growth. Better performance on access often facilitates improved clinician productivity (particularly in utilization, in which we have commonly seen improvements above 20 percent).

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Scheduling online? Hint - ask your patients questions

Posted by Daniel Collins on Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Not all appointment types can be booked online. Nor should they be. But the majority of appointment types can be offered online. Especially for primary care like OBGYN, PCP, Peds, and basic Cardiology.

One reason they have not been offered online in the past is because providers have lacked the ability to guide patients to the right appointment types without first gathering the basic patient information by scheduling staff.

In other words, providers need a way to digitize the scheduler’s interview process before enabling the online application.

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Patient Access - it's about time

Posted by Daniel Collins on Thursday, November 3, 2016

The New York Times recently took a look at why the U.S. still trails many wealthy nations in access to care and argued that while the Affordable Care Act has helped reduce the number of uninsured Americans, it has done little to improve timely access to care:

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